Migraines and IBS

Could Genetics Be To Blame If You Suffer From Both?

 

RELIEF REPORT 006: New cheese options, what does IBS have to do with migraines, and initiatives by big business – with Digestive Health Dietitian, Stephanie Clairmont, RD

Posted by Stephanie Clairmont, RD on miércoles, 23 de agosto de 2017

 

Research Update

Migraines and IBS

Headline: The link between migraines and IBS

What You Need To Know:

A recent study has found that our current understanding of migraines may be missing important genetic factors which relate to IBS.

The study analyzed people that shared genetics (such as parents and their children) as compared to people that lived in similar environments, but were not related. It is important to look at both genes and environment because having a genetic predisposition for any health outcome does not mean it will effect a person.

Genetics are triggered by environmental conditions related to diet and other lifestyle factors, so it is possible to be genetically predisposed to a condition, but never develop it if you lead a healthy, preventative-focused lifestyle.

Currently, according to the International Classification of Disease (ICD) – the tool used by doctors and health professionals to classify diseases – migraines are categorized as a disease of the central nervous system.

After comparing both the genetically related group and the genetically unrelated group, the study found that migraines might be linked to inflammatory conditions in the body, not just the nervous system.

Although a person may suffer from IBS and migraines for completely different reasons, researchers found that IBS and migraines tend to appear in people that share similar genetic backgrounds suggesting a possible link between the two conditions. More research is needed to clarify this connection and what it means for treatment of both conditions.

Related Links:

Stress and IBS

Don’t Stress – Digest!

 

FODMAP Update

Low FODMAP Cheese

Headline: NEW TO THE APP! Quark, a fresh, soft, versatile cheese that can be used in sweet and savoury dishes. Check the app for the low FODMAP serve size

What You Need to Know:

4 Tbsp of quark is low FODMAP! This soft, spreadable cheese makes a great low FODMAP substitute for cream cheese and ricotta. (Note: Ricotta cheese and cream cheese are moderate in lactose at the same serving size of 4 Tbsp)

Quark is high in protein and low in fat. Try it in place of yogurt or cottage cheese in baking, dips, or smoothies.

Surprisingly, most cheeses are low FODMAP, even those made from lactose-containing dairy. The key is to keeping your portion sizes small and enjoying just a little at a time. It’s not necessary to avoid all forms of dairy on a low FODMAP diet, as FODMAP levels can vary drastically depending on how a food is processed.

Including some forms of dairy, like low FODMAP cheeses, is a great way to increase variety in your diet and get some calcium.

Related Links:

How to Enjoy Cheese on a Low FODMAP Diet

Portion Sizes and the Low FODMAP Diet for Healthy Digestion

Dairy Free Part 2: Hold the Lactose!

Dairy Free Part 1: Where is Lactose Lurking?

 

Media Update

Cooking Videos For Digestive Sensitivities

Headline: Nestle Launches new ProNourish Flavour and Hand-to-Pan Videos

What You Need To Know:

Nestle Health Science has created two recipe videos to go along with the launch of the new chocolate flavour of the ProNourish drink – a low FODMAP nutritional drink.

The videos are similar to the simple “hand-and-pan” videos made popular by Buzzfeed and Tasty, but are geared towards those with digestive sensitivities and are both low FODMAP and gluten-free.

Recipes currently available include no-bake bites, fruit kabobs, veggies and hummus, and an open-face PB&J – all great on-the-go snack options, especially for back-to-school!

The recipe videos were released as part of a collaboration with the Celiac Disease Foundation and are available on Youtube.

Related Links:

New Low FODMAP Food Products: FODY, Epicured and ProNourish are Here

Top 5 School Safe and Kid Approved Snacks

Low FODMAP Snacks to Pack On-the-go